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Entries in holiday contact (2)

Wednesday
May092012

BBC Radio 4 Women's Hour Lone Parent Week

This week BBC Radio 4 is running a series of episodes on Lone Parenting during Women's Hour.

Monday's segment on lone parenting discussed the stigma of being a lone parent.

Tuesday's segment discussed the economics of single parenting.

Today Tamsin Greig had an episode on Single Parents: Negotiating Childcare. The programme discussed "how best to negotiate with the absent parent on issues of childcare – such as spending time with the children and holidays; setting rules on boundaries and discipline – from food to bedtimes and video games; how to make big decisions such as choosing schools; and how to provide a united front so the child doesn’t play you off against one another."

Women's Hour is on BBC Radio 4 FM weekdays 10:00am - 11:00am. Lone Parent Week will continue until Friday 11th May.

BBC Radio 4 programmes can be downloaded as podcasts. Podcasts are available to download for 7 days after the programme is broadcast. Alternatively you can listen again on BBC iPlayer.

Sunday
Jul172011

Summer Holiday Pawns

Separated parents are using their children as pawns in disputes over new partners during the summer holidays, according to family lawyers, who claim that up to three quarters of disputes over residence or contact with children are the result of rows about former partners’ new relationships.

The Manchester-based firm Pannone says that the majority of complaints are made by parents worried about being replaced in their children’s affections.

Cara Nuttall, an associate at Pannone, said: “Spending time with parents during the summer holidays increases the likelihood of children meeting their mother or father’s new partner and, therefore, the potential for problems.

“These situations are so emotive that parents sometimes don’t act or think in a rational manner.”  Pannone also believes that up to 30 per cent of complaints about residence or contact with children are in fact attempts to stop former partners making a fresh start.

Ms Nuttall said: “In our experience and that of colleagues across the country, the problem often lies more with the parents than the children involved.  Even though it may be difficult to do, parents need to focus on a child’s best interests.”  (Irish Times)